News Index
Home
Turning Tools
Chucks & 
 Accessories
Woodturning 
 Lathes
Sharpening 
 Systems
Finishes & 
 Adhesives
Tools for 
 Woodworkers
Carving & 
 Whittling
Books & 
 Videos
Health & 
 Safety
Abrasives
Project 
 Parts
Timber For 
 Turners
Training 
 Courses
Client's 
 Clearances
News & 
 Articles
Gift 
 Ideas
Terms & 
 Conditions
Contact Us
How to use 
 this shop

More about The ToolPost's range of imported hardwoods

As a leading supplier of equipment for woodcarving and wood turning purposes, The ToolPost ( http://www.toolpost.co.uk) offers a responsive service and a broad product range that covers all of the craft's requirements. Undoubtedly, one absolutely essential component for effective woodturning is the right timber, and the site also offers an assortment of imported hardwoods in bowl blanks and turning squares. As highly rated as our domestic timber range is, imported hardwoods have long been popular with those desiring a more exotic look in their turned creations.

The extensive range of imported timbers that The ToolPost can ordinarily offer ranges from Macassar Ebony from south-east Asia, Bubinga from Africa and Cocobolo from Central America to the Morrocan Thuya burr hardwood, Indian Sonokeling Rosewood or even Olivewood from our own continent, Europe. In-between these, the curious woodturning professional or amateur can also find the likes of Granadillo from Brazil, Padauk from Africa or the genuine Indian Rosewood timber. If you're interested in trying some of these hardwoods for the first time but are struggling to choose, you could simply pick up one of our mixed exotic timber selection bags, containing turning squares, bowl blanks or a combination of both.

We are especially proud of the high quality Italian-grown Olivewood that we have obtained, with significant dimensions stocked. These include square bowl blanks of up to 250mm (10"), with a depth of 100mm (4"). Meanwhile, our cubes of up to 150mm (6") are a good choice for pestle and mortar projects. Also stocked are spindle blanks and bowl blanks in smaller sizes. We're massive fans of olive for wood turning, such are the dramatic end results that can be obtained, and it's difficult not to love its odour. However, if you are trying out this wood, we would still recommend that you don't leave dust or shavings on your tools or any exposed lathe components, given the sap's tendency to corrode and discolour.

Indeed, we would advise you to be a little more careful when investing in tropical timbers, researching the species that most interests you beforehand, so that you are aware of any known hazards. After all, while adverse reactions can be suffered and even long-term harm sustained from domestic hardwoods being injudiciously used, imported timbers pose an even greater risk. If, in the middle of wood turning or even beforehand or afterwards, you develop any suspect reaction, such as respiratory difficulty, dermatitis (e.g. itching skin) or sore eyes, we would always urge you to seek immediate medical advice.

Nonetheless, tropical timbers take pride of place in a range here at The ToolPost (http://www.toolpost.co.uk ) that also includes domestic timbers, project materials, timber specialities and timber for wood carving. Online right now, it is possible to order all manner of exotic hardwood bowl blanks from us, including everything from African Blackwood bowl blanks to Zebrano bowl blanks, while we also offer such items as Pink Ivory and Purpleheart turning squares. Whichever timbers you choose, we can only wish you the very greatest success with your woodturning endeavours.

Editor's Note: The ToolPost (http://www.toolpost.co.uk/index.html) is represented by the search engine advertising and digital marketing specialists Jumping Spider Media. Please direct all press queries to Louise Byrne. Email: louise@jumpingspidermedia.co.uk or call: +44 (0)20 3070 1959 / +34 952 783 637.

1997-2010 P. Hemsley.  The information on this website is the copyright property of Peter Hemsley.  Coeur du Bois and The ToolPost are trading styles of Peter Hemsley.  Whilst reasonable efforts are made to ensure the accuracy of information presented, no liability can be accepted for errors in this information nor for contingencies arising therefrom.  If you are inexperienced in any aspect of woodworking, we would strongly counsel that you take a course of formal instruction before commencing to practice